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Greetings to all-

My first post here, and may I say, I get a lot out of this forum. It's a great source of useful information and perspective. I am new to the K world, it's been about two months since I bought my '99 K1200 RS. Clearly the beginning of a long love affair, and no need to explain that here, eh?

I had an interesting mechanical failure today that I thought would be worth sharing. Fortunately, no harm came to either the bike or rider, so I am counting my blessings. My K came with the Verholen footpeg lowering kit installed. You can check it out at:

http://www.mv-motorrad.de/cosmoshop...37,001.0018,907216,,12Tshowrub--001.0018,.htm

Ergonomically this kit is a good thing, as I am just over six feet tall. The kit consists of the two side panels and a linkage piece, which extends the shifter lever downward to compensate for the lower foot position. The short story is that I pulled up to a traffic light, came to a stop, shifted into first and that linkage arm broke! Just broke right in two. You can imagine the feeling of moving your left foot to shift, just like the last thousand shifts you've done, and- nothings there!

Thank God I noticed it right away. Yep, sure enough- that's my shifter lever, laying there on the pavement under my bike. I did find this to be slightly stressful for a few moments.... Fortunately I wasn't too many miles from home, and I figured out how to reach up and in with my toe to shift with the remaining portion of lever. Geez.

Upon closer inspection, it turns out that this little linkage arm, (which is about 3" long, 3/4" wide, and about 7/16" (1 cm) thick) is actually made from three seperate pieces and welded together (!). Each end is machined to accept the stock lever end and fastener, and the middle third is just straight billet. The two welds are clearly visible, in spite of the machining and anodizing.

I wish I had a digital camera so I could post pictures of this failed piece of aluminum machine work. I am not a machinist, or an engineer, or even very knowledgeable about motorcycles in general, but to me this seems like a pretty cheesy (and potentially dangerous) way to make a part- in this case, one of the only parts on the bike that by design will take a consistent amount of impact and stress from the rider. Am I off base here? And what if I had been in traffic at freeway speed when this little nugget decided to go...? Yikes.

So I guess I will be looking for some help from a local machine shop to fab up a replacement. As dilemnas go, it could be a lot worse... but for now, my ride is pretty seriously compromised...
 

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No bogey's twist wrist
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shifter lever

actually a lot of aluminum parts are made in pieces then welded by a variety of methods, properly done the weld is stronger than the surounding metal. you can have it re-welded by a competant weld shop. Its easier to weld parts of compex configurations than to try and machine them, less time consuming also. Yours probably wasn't pre-heated properly or something like that. No big deal it happens. Get it fixed and ride, These bikes are great and IMO destined to be the best of the k series in looks and longevity. The jap clones will probably end up expensive throwaways.
 
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