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Having been bored out of my mind since the pandemic shutdown, I bought another K12R after I sold my first over a decade ago. And incapable of leaving well enough alone, I started tinkering with it, adding all the bits and pieces many do with a bike purchase, including frame, fork, and swing-arm sliders, as well as bar-end mirrors and a super loud aftermarket horn. The bike already came with the standard performance upgrades: performance exhaust, Power Commander unit, and reusable air filter, but none of that was enough because someone once told me back in my college theater days that "it's not done 'til it's overdone" so I've embarked on a custom fiberglass project using some of the prop-making skills I learned in school.

After my first major, serious-injury crash in 2007 (after, at the time, 27 years of injury-free riding) I decided to no longer carry passengers on the back of whatever bike I was riding. One way to keep me from ever even being tempted to make an exception was to remove the passenger pegs of whatever bike I purchased. Then, I decided to remove any trace of a passenger seat which led me to building custom fiberglass solo-seat tails on my last few motorcycles. I started with an R1, then I did it to an SV650, and finally my other current bike, an FZ1-- all to varying degrees of aesthetic success. And now, years after my last custom build, I'm doing it to my second K1200R. I just wanted to share the progress because, I figured, the only people who might even be vaguely interested in this have to be here on this site. My design concept is simple: follow the same aesthetic of the original tail, just make it shorter. I bought a used subframe, torn saddle, damaged tail piece for the tail light insert, and a second tail light so I can continue riding the bike while working on the project. Here's a photo of the sculpture on the rotating sculpt stand. The sculpture is maybe 75% complete as seen here. I chopped the second seat and will have it professionally reupholstered once the tail piece has been cast. And this time I think I'm going to take a stab at casting the part in carbon fiber, instead of fiberglass, but we'll see how the final "pattern" (clay sculpture to be cast) looks once it is completed before making the final decision on the part's end-material. It's a lot easier to fix mistakes in fiberglass than it is when something is made from carbon fiber. You can't Bondo carbon fiber.
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Hello there,
I have been looking to do that to my K1200 R for a while, I have found some kits from Europe but they are very expensive. I was wondering how to go about this, and your first pic explained it all! how are you making out the the finished seat eliminator?
Thx
Jason
 

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Hello there,
I have been looking to do that to my K1200 R for a while, I have found some kits from Europe but they are very expensive. I was wondering how to go about this, and your first pic explained it all! how are you making out the the finished seat eliminator?
Thx
Jason
Hey, Jason. I don't remember what I write in my long-winded post above, but yeah, the basic mold building process is pretty simple, but this time around I want to do two things I haven't done before (apologies if I already said this above). One, make a mold that I don't have to destroy to remove the part. And, two, cast it in carbon fiber instead of fiberglass. I'm pretty confident I can do the former, but not so much the latter as there is no room for error with CF where there is with FG. You can't Bondo CF. All that said, I've barely touched the project since I posted, but have recently continued with the sculpt that I think I'm about four hours from completing. Then, the hard part: making a reusable mold. Then, like I said, the really hard part of actually casting it. But to be honest, I've sort of lost interest in it as I've sort of lost interest in the bike. I mean it's a great ride, but a ride I've already owned and experienced more than a decade ago. That old saying about "you can never go home" after you've moved out, is true even here. I think the only reason I'll finish this project is I hate quitting things before they are completed. So I'm really taking my time with this one. If you start a project like this, let me know if you have any basic questions, and I'll do my best to answer them. Good luck! - John

PS: Also, this site, as upgraded as it looks these days, is kind of sad to me. Nothing to do with the site itself, but when I was last a member of it, a decade ago, there were so many more K1200R owners. If you posted anything back then, you were almost sure to get at least a half-dozen responses from other owners within 24 hours. But that was back when the bike was still being produced and sold. And those days, for this model, are clearly gone now.
 

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Hello John
Hey thanks for the response! I have experience with fiberglass and polystyrene resin, but I have not done any CF yet. from what I understand it is more of an epoxy resin and has a longer cure time.I have some mold making experience on a smaller level , and there are ways to remove the base model with out destruction. , Back in 2005/2006, BMW had there Motorrad Power-Cup series, and the K1200 R was the racing beast. on the actual race bikes it looked like they had a slip on rear seat eliminator, but it is hard to tell on the web photos. When I stop at a red light people ask all the time 'What t BMW-K-Power-Cup-2.jpg he hell is that? ". The K1200 R was a rare bird where I live.
 

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Hello John
Hey thanks for the response! I have experience with fiberglass and polystyrene resin, but I have not done any CF yet. from what I understand it is more of an epoxy resin and has a longer cure time.I have some mold making experience on a smaller level , and there are ways to remove the base model with out destruction. , Back in 2005/2006, BMW had there Motorrad Power-Cup series, and the K1200 R was the racing beast. on the actual race bikes it looked like they had a slip on rear seat eliminator, but it is hard to tell on the web photos. When I stop at a red light people ask all the time 'What t View attachment 27715 he hell is that? ". The K1200 R was a rare bird where I live.
Is this your K12R pictured, Jason, or just an example of a PowerCup race bike you're talking about? Here's a photo of my former bike (white & black color scheme). There are probably other photos of it posted under my former username, PrivateAxis (w/o the 2.0). I don't remember where I got the seat cover, but there were a lot of nice aftermarket items available back then that are nowhere to be found these days, including the cowl. And it sounds like you're more skilled at this mold making business than I am, so maybe I'll reach out to YOU when I hit a roadblock with this thing. A little research tells me that the trick to making reusable fiberglass molds for fiberglass parts is to cast the model/plug/part/sculpt (whatever the clay part is called) with a flexible molding material (can't remember what it's called) first, then reinforce that with FG. With all of my previous FG projects I just made the molds from Plaster of Paris applied directly over the clay, in two parts. Sloppy and woefully amateurish, but for a one-off it worked fine, but I also had several people ask me for a duplicate piece for their bikes, but I've never been able to because the molds were wrecked while pulling the first part. But thanks to YouTube, there are all sorts of How-To videos posted, so when I get to the actual mold-making phase of this, I'll have another look at them for guidance. BTW, that "Denali" tag is pointing to the extra-loud aftermarket horn I installed this bike and all my rides for the last fifteen or so years.


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That looks sweet! That tail mod is exactly what I want to do. That pic is from a power cup race bike . My k1200 is pretty much stock. I want to make it a single seat and remove the handle racks.attached is my bike.i have bar end mirrors installed now.
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Is this your K12R pictured, Jason, or just an example of a PowerCup race bike you're talking about? Here's a photo of my former bike (white & black color scheme). There are probably other photos of it posted under my former username, PrivateAxis (w/o the 2.0). I don't remember where I got the seat cover, but there were a lot of nice aftermarket items available back then that are nowhere to be found these days, including the cowl. And it sounds like you're more skilled at this mold making business than I am, so maybe I'll reach out to YOU when I hit a roadblock with this thing. A little research tells me that the trick to making reusable fiberglass molds for fiberglass parts is to cast the model/plug/part/sculpt (whatever the clay part is called) with a flexible molding material (can't remember what it's called) first, then reinforce that with FG. With all of my previous FG projects I just made the molds from Plaster of Paris applied directly over the clay, in two parts. Sloppy and woefully amateurish, but for a one-off it worked fine, but I also had several people ask me for a duplicate piece for their bikes, but I've never been able to because the molds were wrecked while pulling the first part. But thanks to YouTube, there are all sorts of How-To videos posted, so when I get to the actual mold-making phase of this, I'll have another look at them for guidance. BTW, that "Denali" tag is pointing to the extra-loud aftermarket horn I installed this bike and all my rides for the last fifteen or so years.


View attachment 27717
did you ever use any type of mold release? It has been a while, but the type I used was a water based liquid, when dried, it left a waxy barrier that alowed the piese to pop out of the mold.I would be glad to help with mold making questions.I am not a pro, but I know enough to be dangerous!. On the picture above... are the handlebars / clipons dropped a bit? that was another thing I wanted to on mine.
 

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did you ever use any type of mold release? It has been a while, but the type I used was a water based liquid, when dried, it left a waxy barrier that alowed the piese to pop out of the mold.I would be glad to help with mold making questions.I am not a pro, but I know enough to be dangerous!. On the picture above... are the handlebars / clipons dropped a bit? that was another thing I wanted to on mine.
Well, I did use a brush-on, water-based mold release that I got from my favorite, but now-defunct, FG store in Santa Monica. And I also coated the mold with a thick layer of mold release wax. As I recall (and I'm not even sure I do), the problem with my unintentional single-use molds was more the architecture of the negative mold than anything else. The fact is all of the molds I made were just sloppily created, nothing like the clean, squared-off sides of anything I've seen on YouTube. I do remember one piece I made had intentional undercuts sculpted in, so the mold had to be broken to get the part out. It was another two-piece mold that it clearly should have been at least a three-piece mold to avoid those undercuts, but my laziness prevailed. Besides, I didn't need more than one of any of the parts I made.

Thinking about this further, I'm pretty sure I'll just cast the final piece in FG, not CF, and have it professionally painted using BMW factory paint. If I were mentally more into this, I'd experiment with the CF, but my lack of enthusiasm would ultimately mean that I'd just make mistakes if I went the CF route. My ultimate goal, really, is just to create something that looks factory to anyone who asks. I also don't know if I mentioned it, but the new tail will only be about eight inches shorter than the stock tail, and that's because of the geometry of what's inside and beneath it: the seat pan and the shortened subframe; otherwise, I would have made it so the tail light was practically right up against the backside of the chopped front seat. I used a chopped stock seat because I didn't want to change up the fastening structure, so would be able to retain the OEM mounting hardware. Aesthetically, I just wanted to retain the look and vibe of the original tail. With the other bikes I experimented with radical differences in theme, and in the end it just looked garage-built.

And, oh, yeah, that duct tape on the seat was there to secure it to the frame during the first sculpt phase. The seat is off now so I can clean up all the rough and uneven areas which are legion.

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I was talking a about the duct tape on my seat! Now it has wide flex seal tape sealing it, until I figure out what I am going to do. About the pic you posted above , the sculpture looks great, you did an excellent job. This might be a dumb question... do you remove the clay model from the frame? I have used two part latex rubber to make molds, using plaster poured in a box to hold the part, mold release, then pour the latex, and allow to set. This also allows air bubbles to rise away from the model. Remove the plaster Half, and pour more latex. Pros put the liquid latex or RTV in a vaccum to remove air bubbles. One thing I have not done but could be an option is the use of a slow cure expandable foam.
I used to get fiberglass supplies at a boat building supply shop in Connecticut where I grew up. Industrial grade stuff!.
 

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That's an interesting process. But, no, I've always made the mold with the clay still on the frame; otherwise, it would deform then end up not fitting properly. I wish I had taken a video of my earliest efforts--talk about a comedy of errors. Not only because of the awkwardness of just getting the plaster molds made while the clay is still on the frame, but doing it with the frame is still on the bike! And doing it in my apartment's underground parking structure with that crappy dim fluorescent lighting that old parking structures have. You know, where none of them radiate the same amount of light and where there is only about one overhead fixture for every four or so parking spaces. Naturally my spot was the furthest any light. And for the entire parking area there was ONE electrical plug for an additional light. And that plug was easily 25 yards from my spot. I honestly think my 20/20 vision started to go South that year.

Like I think I mentioned, this sculpt is not complete, but close. Just have to add the nodules under the tail for the turn signals and smooth all the surfaces and sharpen the angles. I have integrated turn signals on the FZ1, and they look clean and sleek, but they're also illegal and not as effective as properly spaced signals. And as I've gotten older I prefer quieter pipes (though neither of mine are) and proper lighting. I've been hospitalized four times since 2007 with life threatening injuries, thanks to four cellphone-distracted drivers, so for me it's all about being seen. I don't even buy black helmets or jackets any longer though I still wear the ones I still have. I noticed the "recommended readings" below these comments. I see one of my old ones under my previous username, but also see one from one of the best contributors, JCW. I wonder if he's still posting. There were several really great K12R owners on the forum back in the day, but I'm sure they've all moved on to other bikes and other forums.
 

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That sucks hearing about your accidents. It's moronic... I will be on the highway and people will be in the left lane doing 50 while they are checking out their Facebook page. Then they look at me like I'm the jackass. Discusting. Massachusetts is a hands free state but it's not enforced. At all. Same with Rhode Island. Lane Splitting isn't legal here but I avoid doing it because it seems very few people are paying attention.
I am trying to think of a media other than sculpting clay that could could cure and not shrink or warp as it dried, to make a solid blank that can be used to make the mold.
 

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I did some research on the different sculpting material, and the oil based clays seem the best way to go as far as I can tell. Perhaps the future in this, as it appears to be the future for everything, is 3D Printing, but that's for the molders with money as this time. If I didn't mention it, that weekend FZ1 experiment of doing the entire project over the course of a single weekend, and as inexpensively as possible, was done in water-based ceramic pottery clay. But, boy, was that frustrating. I had to keep the clay damp during the entire process, and when it came time to cast in the plaster, I let it dry right up to the point I thought it might start to visibly shrink before slapping on the wet plaster. Surprisingly, it came out pretty good as far as the end-part halves fitting perfectly together, then the final piece fitting on the bike. Obviously with the plasticine (sp?) you can take your bloody time with it as I have on this current project of perpetual procrastination.

As far as freeway riding goes, it's where I feel the safest on a bike as I've never had a single incident on a freeway after nearly forty years and hundreds of thousands of miles on a bike on such a road. And many international studies have determined that, when done safely, lane sharing/splitting is very safe. In fact, you probably know that we're the only civilized country in the world where it is not a universally legal thing to do. That it helps with traffic slow alone should be the reason every state in the union allows it. Blows me away that some states allow riders to go helmetless, but they won't let them share lanes. America. But if I couldn't lane split here in California, I'm pretty sure I would have stopped street riding years ago. When you can safely get anywhere in a quarter (or better) of the time it takes in a car--and legally--why be in a car? Unless you need to carry people or a lot of anything else, there's no reason to be in a car here in Los Angeles where it's pretty much sunshine 365 days of the year. But just between you, me, and the wind, I've already told myself if I get into one more accident that requires an overnight stay in a hospital, I'll hang up my helmet for good. Until then, I'll ride until I can't.
 

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Ya, helmets are optional in RI and Connecticut, Here in Massachusetts it's mandatory. And I'm fine with that. I agree, too that the highway is my favorite road to ride, It just seems everyone has a phone glued to their ear.
 

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Jason, a quick and entirely unrelated question regarding a problem I'm now having with this bike, and one that I also had with my 2006 unit: the bike mysteriously stalls out. When it's warm out and I've been riding a while (though not that long), when I come to a light or a stop sign the bike just mysteriously stalls out. The other day, it got worse and worse as I was headed home, to the point where after I kept restarting, it was misfiring while at speed, to the point that it just stalled out completely while in motion, not at a stop. I had to coast to the side of the road and let it cool down (even though the temp gauge read well below the overheat mark). It wouldn't even restart until I shad been there for several minutes. I did a search on this forum and apparently it happened (old threads) to a lot of K12R and K13S owners. A few owners offered remedies (air box upgrade and/or a new ECU upload), but none of these remedies worked and no dealer seemed to be able to replicate it or offer a remedy that worked. Has this happened to you? With the old unit, it happened only occasionally and only at light, but would fire right back up. As noted, it's a lot worse with this bike.

But it is funny how we only think of the good things when reminiscing about our past (vehicles and girlfriends come to mind now), but rarely do we remember the reasons why we got rid of these things in the first place. I also have that howling brake issue with this bike that I and many others reported back in the day. But now I know what that problem was/is and know of an inexpensive remedy for it. But this stalling issue could be dangerous in traffic. Thoughts?
 

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After you let it sit for a while and you started the bike did it misfire? 2nd, was the check engine indicator on? Possible suspects: O2 sensor, Crank position sensor, or a large vacuum leak. I was a German car mechanic before I started my present career, and a lot of the same issues that I saw in cars I see with " das Motorrad". My bike had an issue towards the end of the summer, while stuck in traffic, it had a terrible idle, and it would stall out. The ck eng went on once. When I scanned it it had a bad 02 sensor fault. I watched the sensors perimeters and it was dead Installed a Bosch " universal" sensor( one you splice into the original O2 harness) and it was a difference between night and day . After 200 miles, no faults are stored.
Crank sensor tells the ECU the crank position..no signal for this sensor and it does not know when to fire.they can fail with out triggering a fault. When they are on there way out, heat can effect them, and it can be an intermittent.
Large vacuum leak can also be an issue 0but this would be noticable right away.

There other things too on my machine that I suspect, like a stuck vent valve, throttle bodies out of sync etc. I purchased an app called motoscan, and it is unbelievable. Works with windows or Android. Saved me a lot of money and aggravation.
There could be other issues too, but this is what came to mind. What howling brake issue do you have? Mine are noisy as hell.
And I have clutch issues too, but that's another story..
 

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Wow, thank you for this. I can't remember the last time I took handwritten notes from what is basically an email.

That day it stalled out at a light in West Hollywood, then got progressively worse until it wouldn't even start up again, once I did get it going again (after about a five-minute wait at the side of the road) iit still stuttered again before I made that last mile to home. But, no, during all of this neither the temp gauge read hot (only four bars showing) nor did the Check Engine light ever come on. The Banshee-like screech from the brakes has gotten worse, too, but it is the exact same sound I heard from my previous K12R. And everyone on the forum seemed to be suffering from this issue, too. It's interesting to note that BMW claimed to have resolved what I called the Banshee Brake Mystery for the 2008 model without ever saying what the problem was; unfortunately, now that I have one, I can see that they clearly did not fix the problem. Back with my original K12R, I was so desperate to fix it, I even went so far as to spend over a grand on new aftermarket rotors and pads as owners were thinking it may have been the cheap and thin-ish OEM rotors. Finally, someone far smarter than me hypothesized that the screech was the result of the vibration made when the brake pistons came into contact with the back of the brake pads, that with hard braking the vibration became audible. The same owner mentioned that these little round stickers were available to stick on the back of the pads where the pistons contacted the pad, that the sticker pack was created for this very problem that, apparently, many vehicles suffer. And that $8 pack of stickers did the trick! I just wish that I had lept the remaining stickers because when I did a Google search nothing for motorcycles showed up and only one vender was selling them for cars, but at a relatively high cost. It occured to me that they were simply heavy duty vinyl stickers with adhesive backing. I have a leftover sheet of pads from an order I placed from TechSpecUSA (the tank pads I've used for my last ten or so bikes), so I'll just find that remnant I know I have somewhere and cut little circles from it. That, hopefully, will solve that problem. And though I do all my basic moto-servicing (oil change, chain )on other bikes), brakes flushing, and installing whatever bolt-on thing I buy, if the task requires any electronic/electrical knowledge or skill beyond simple soldering I am a complete dope. I took my old KTM SuperDuke 990 in a few years back because of a similar stalling issue, but the dealership could not replicate the problem, so did nothing but charge me the $130 for the hour of trying. Not doing that again, so I'll call the BMW shop near me, explain the problem and ask them if they are familiar with it as so many owners have complained of it on the forums. If they are not familiar with the issue, I'll share your list of possible culprits and see what they say. But I'm not long for this bike if the problem persists unchecked and unresolved. Last night I went to Redondo Beach (30 miles away) to meet friends for dinner, but worried the whole way that the stall-out was going to happen again. And on the way home on the 405, at about 70 mph, the engine sputtered once, but enough to mildly jolt me forward. That app you mentioned, Motoscan, sounds interesting, but naturally I primarily use Apple products, so don't really have a device to use it. I've had a dozen Macs since 1992 and have never had a single major issue with any of them. I've used many PCs at work, and every single one of them had major issues that I never experienced with a Mac. And the one PC I purchased for work, one that came highly recommended and was at or near the top of the lists for Laptops Under $500, it is the first computer I've owned that I can confidently say is a lemon. I have spent as much as it originally cost on service, but the slow-down problem remains. I went with the inexpensive laptop because I figured I would only use it for work, so browsing, email, and accounting software--that's it. But it still couldn't handle it, and Dell would not help me at all even though the problem happened right out of the gate and I was sill within my warranty. Apparently they don't cover the OS of their own computers, because after hours of testing over the phone, they came to the conclusion that it was an OS issue, not a hardware issue. I bought more memory and a module to speeden it up, but nothing helped, By the end of a work day the laptop just stopped working. So, obviously, I will never buy another PC device again. I'll check out this app and consider getting it, but I would have to use it on that same defective Dell, so maybe not. But now I am curious about your clutch issue. Mine came with an aftermarket QuickShifter that I've never used, and when I looked it up on the forums, a few owners said it could actually damage the bike. Great. Now what...
 

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I have never been to LA, but a few years back I went to Encinitas for a winter surf trip for a couple weeks. I loved it there. January in SoCal is paradise compared to a January in Massachusetts.
I am glad I was able to help, and that it will help guide to an easy fix. A solution to the diagnostic software is get a cheap tablet. the MotoScan runs off Android or windows, and a cheap tablet could be just for motorrad diagnostics. As long as it has Bluetooth to communicate with OBD Bluetooth module, it will work. I got the OBD module and the BMW round terminal adapter off amazon for under 100$.
, That is a great idea about the brake noise. I used synthetic high heat brake grease on all the contact points on the brake pads, which helped but did not last. I was going to replace the rotors even though they are well with in spec, but I will hold off and try the shim method that you described. I did replace the pads, Galfer.. and they where quiet for about 150 - 200 miles.
Ya, K12's are known for clutch issues. From what I read in this forum, one of the reasons is improper oil flow in the basket, and weak springs. Last summer (2019) I lost my clutch on the highway and had to nurse it home on back roads. The middle two OEM clutch disks were wiped out.Two things though, I do not know if the previous owner beat the hell out of it and, the middle disks led me to believe its an oil issue. Although, since I replaced the O2 sensor, I have not gotten the famous clutch rattle, which is possible because the poor idle was dipping down to a real low RPM, which can lower the oil pressure. What I might do is get a used clutch basket and modify it as described on this forum. from what I read there is a guy in the UK who modifies the basket with great success and has a lot of info on his modification. I do all my own machining and it would be a fun project. BTW I replaced the OEM clutch disks with a Barnet set.

When I was in Encinitas, a dolphin breached right next to me while I was waiting for a set, and I practically ran on water until I realized what it was. I was amazed watching dolphins playing in the surf and chasing fish. In Mass and RI we have lots of seals and a growing amount of Great Whites..:oops:
 

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I have never been to LA, but a few years back I went to Encinitas for a winter surf trip for a couple weeks. I loved it there. January in SoCal is paradise compared to a January in Massachusetts.
I am glad I was able to help, and that it will help guide to an easy fix. A solution to the diagnostic software is get a cheap tablet. the MotoScan runs off Android or windows, and a cheap tablet could be just for motorrad diagnostics. As long as it has Bluetooth to communicate with OBD Bluetooth module, it will work. I got the OBD module and the BMW round terminal adapter off amazon for under 100$.
, That is a great idea about the brake noise. I used synthetic high heat brake grease on all the contact points on the brake pads, which helped but did not last. I was going to replace the rotors even though they are well with in spec, but I will hold off and try the shim method that you described. I did replace the pads, Galfer.. and they where quiet for about 150 - 200 miles.
Ya, K12's are known for clutch issues. From what I read in this forum, one of the reasons is improper oil flow in the basket, and weak springs. Last summer (2019) I lost my clutch on the highway and had to nurse it home on back roads. The middle two OEM clutch disks were wiped out.Two things though, I do not know if the previous owner beat the hell out of it and, the middle disks led me to believe its an oil issue. Although, since I replaced the O2 sensor, I have not gotten the famous clutch rattle, which is possible because the poor idle was dipping down to a real low RPM, which can lower the oil pressure. What I might do is get a used clutch basket and modify it as described on this forum. from what I read there is a guy in the UK who modifies the basket with great success and has a lot of info on his modification. I do all my own machining and it would be a fun project. BTW I replaced the OEM clutch disks with a Barnet set.

When I was in Encinitas, a dolphin breached right next to me while I was waiting for a set, and I practically ran on water until I realized what it was. I was amazed watching dolphins playing in the surf and chasing fish. In Mass and RI we have lots of seals and a growing amount of Great Whites..:oops:
It occurs to me that you're the kind of person qualified and equipped to own a mechanically temperamental motorcycle like the K12R, not me. Most of my bikes over the years have been from Japan, bikes with few surprises and that you can throw off a cliff (or into the side of a left-turning car) and it will likely keep running. I've owned a handful of exotics, and every single one of them have been more of a headache than any of the Japanese bikes. Sure, maybe not as sexy as the bikes from England, Germany, and Austria--but bikes I don't lose sleep over either. And I've read about your Great Whites. Crappy clutch baskets and squealing brakes would seem like laughable problems when looking down the snout of a Great White swimming your way.
 

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Agreed, a noisy clutch is minor compared to looking down the gullet of a great white.. awesome animal though.
Ya, I worked on German vehicles long enough where I can deal with the quarks that they are known for. K12 R is a rare bird around here. That being said .If A YZF-R1 with the Yellow - black - white anniversary paint scheme landed in my driveway I would be pretty happy. Another favorite if mine was a GSXR 750. I have a Suzuki dual sport that needs an engine ( bought it like that, cheap). Looking forward to getting that up and running, bomb around trails or zip around town . Agreed... Japanese bikes are very dependable for the most part. I tell people all the time that the best bike out there is is the one in the your driveway. .
How is the seat cowl project?
 
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