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Discussion Starter #1
it's probably here somewhere but. . .

what's the best way to tie down the gt on a trailer? i've read that attaching tie-downs to the grips will ruin the heating elements and probably crush the twist-grip sleeve.
is this so-or no/

something to pack that's compact would be the best of course.

thanks, Steve
 

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I don't use a trailer, but have tied down on a ferry several times. I would steer clear of grips. The frame is the way to go. The GT gives easy to access plenty of tie down points. That whole area in front of the rear tire that looks like an erector set, start there. The fron fork tubes, and the wheels are also good spots to use. :)
 

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When I moved from Portland, OR to Virginia Beach, Virginia last March, I went to my local BMW dealer and purchased a Canyon Dancer Bar Harness. Loaded the bike in the back of my Chevy Silverado and after carefully positioning the bar-harness over the grips to make sure nothing could twist or bind, I then synched it down on each side with two rachet straps with just enough tension to keep the bike vertical and pressed against the front of the truck bed. I then used two more ratchet straps from each side of the front wheel to the same hooks in the floor to keep the wheel straight against the front of the truck bed. This keeps you from needing to use excessive tension on the straps to the handle bars. Frankly I was more concerned about snapping off a handle bar than I was possibly damaging a heated grip.

With a short bed truck I had to leave the tail gate down so the only other thing I did was use two more ratchet straps through and around the rear tire to hold the rear end of the bike in the center of the bed. 3200 miles of sometimes seriously rough highway later I'm in Virginia, the bike doesn't have a scratch and the heated grips work just fine.

I've trailered the bike a couple of times since using the same tie-down method without any problems. However my new local dealer made the same comment as others have that a bar-harness will damage the heated grips. All I know is that it works for me and so far it's the safest, easiest method I've found to tie-down my bike when needed.
 

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Guess I'm trailer trash. I've had my bike hauled a couple of times by a racer that hauls bikes all over. He used Canyon Dancers and the heated grips still work just fine.
 

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Tie Down

On both my pick up and trailer, I use soft ties wrapped about the front forks at the lowest place above the fender. I use wrachet tie downs to snug the bike to the front brackets, which are about a 45 degree angle each side. Seems the top most front fork location causes the tie down to rub the fairing. Then I use soft ties slip knot fashion around the grips on each side, just snug enough to keep the bike from tending to rock side to side, but not snug enough to take most of the strain.

Have towed all over the east coast and mid west this way, with no issues.

Rusty
 

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tie down for trailering

invest in a wheeldock, for about $300 or so you can haul the GT securely without putting a strain on the handlebars and front suspension. I checked out all the wheel chock systems and settled on the wheeldock brand. Wheeldock has a model that is fitted to the 120/70/17 tire or you can buy one that will fit other size tires as well using spacers made for the wheeldock. Strap the front tire to the dock itself and a couple straps on the rear of the bike and you're ready to go. For the most part you can load and unload via one man operation. Wheeldock.com
 
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