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Discussion Starter #1
I keep meaning to ask this: in addition to the usual lot of sockets, wrenches, allen wrenches, etc., what other basic tools should be added for working on the KRS. Obviously, a healthy range of Torx or star drivers is in order, but which ones? And any leads for an inexpensive (not cheap, just not Snap-On prices, either) source is welcome, too.
 

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Clymer manual, star bits T-10-T30, oil filter wrench, metric long handle allen key set, metric T-handle hex key set, set of hex sockets, to do the oil filter you need either a 14mm or a 17mm hex socket ( I just bought the 4pc Craftsman set that had both). I suggest harbor freight or northern tools for picking up most of these.
 

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I recommend a 3mm hex driver - I have one that looks like a screwdriver - for the body panel screws. Makes the job ... well, not a breeze, but a lot easier. I got mine from Wiha.

I really prefer Craftsman tools. They're more expensive than the stuff you find at Home Depot or Harbor Freight, but that lifetime guarantee is hard to beat. I had a socket driver go bad on me on a road trip once, far from home - walked into Sears, swapped it out for a new one with no trouble at all. Just hard to beat that.

Shannon said:
to do the oil filter you need either a 14mm or a 17mm hex socket
Could you explain this a bit more? How do you use a 14mm or a 17mm socket on the oil filter? If you meant the oil drain, which is it - 14 or 17? Thanks.

--chiba
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doh! on Clymer - I'll head off to Amazon and pull the rigger on that one now. Star bits at HF are something of an aggro. That is, I went to the local HF store looking for a good range of bits and... nada. They do have some in their 100 piece "warranty breaker" tool kit (all the weird bits needed to open stuff you're not supposed to open) but when it comes to the bigger bits, forget that. I also tried Sears and found a really bizarre set of T-handles (10 & 15, 30 & 40, or close to it). Otherwise... nada. I really, really, really don't want to chase down a Mac or Snap-On truck. [/hurl] Sockets, hex T-handles, etc. (SAE or metric), I'm good to go.
 

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I have a battery powered small electric hand tool that will hold those small torque screwdriver tips and philps heads. Takes about 5 minutes to remove the tupperware.

I have all Snap-on Tools but for what you need to do just go to Harbor Frieght or Sears and get a tool kit. rachet and socket set for 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 inch drive set of metric with a set of socket for allen, and torque.and all the combo wreches.

I highly recomend a 3/8 and 1/2 drive torque wrenches for everyone, so you know how tight to make things. Every thing.

I also use blue Lock-Tite on most everything. you can get this in a stick container just like "chap-stick". just some insurance the bolts don't back off.

Some where on this site or some others there is a torque chart for all BMW bikes. I have attached the conversion chart to inch and ft pounds.
 

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What do ya know... Lowe's Kobalt line includes a nice set of Torx "sockets" for under $30. Some are 3/8, some are 1/4, but at least I'm better off than I was at Sears.
 

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going o bump this thread...

Say I was to start from scratch and needed a basic toolkit for just routine maintenance, where do I start? I had a 125 pc craftsman set that suited me well, but that's loaned to a farm at the moment. Is this where I should start? or do I need a more robust set to build into... We should get a sticky or something up with a basic set of tools for maintenance.
 

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Wiha Tools gets my vote for Torx stuff. German made and it fits like it's supposed to. They even have screw-holding Torx drivers.

I had to use their ball-end T-15 Torx driver today to get some silly screws out that the straight-in and T-handle wouldn't get to.


Mack
 

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Torque Wrenches

:twocents: I'll second the Fllash on the torque wrench advise and add: Torque wrenches should be calibrated episodically to insure accuracy. In addition, those with ratcheting spring loaded handles need to be backed off to zero when not in use to reduce the chance of spring fatigue which will reduce accuracy.
Cheers,
Winegrower
 
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