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Check with the BMW auto dealers. Some of the cars are the exact same color as the bike. In particular, the Orient Blue Metallic is an exact match. Touch up tube is $30.
I had some of my panels repainted and the factory paint for this color really is dead on. Everyone that has looked at the paint job can't tell which panels were repainted.
 

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grab it from BMW

Jerry,

If you need touch up paint, then the best/cheapest source is from the BMW shop. Although, if you have some major body refinishing, then a paint shop would be cheaper.

ONON,
Mark
 

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realwrld said:
Check with the BMW auto dealers. Some of the cars are the exact same color as the bike. In particular, the Orient Blue Metallic is an exact match. Touch up tube is $30.
I had some of my panels repainted and the factory paint for this color really is dead on. Everyone that has looked at the paint job can't tell which panels were repainted.
The color may be dead on, but when a metallic is applied with the brush supplied, the result can look anything but "dead on". Metallics cannot be successfully matched by brush application.

If you want a larger amount of a true paint match, paint is available dead-on matched to BMW's colors from the OEM paint manufacturer Glasurit. You need to get the Bike's Paint Code (not the "Finish Code" listed under the seat, but the actual PAINT CODE specified by the Finish Code). Once you have that, Glasurit has the exact paint formulation to match the code. Not surprising that the Glasurit paint match is so exact ....they supply paint to BMW in the first place.

Bob.
 

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also make sure that you rteally need paint...if its just the clear, polish it out after applying a clear touch up....sometimes just a scratch on the clear can look like hell and i have had people ask me to repaint things that never needed it....just a little time and its like new...
 

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RFWILSON said:
The color may be dead on, but when a metallic is applied with the brush supplied, the result can look anything but "dead on". Metallics cannot be successfully matched by brush application.

If you want a larger amount of a true paint match, paint is available dead-on matched to BMW's colors from the OEM paint manufacturer Glasurit. You need to get the Bike's Paint Code (not the "Finish Code" listed under the seat, but the actual PAINT CODE specified by the Finish Code). Once you have that, Glasurit has the exact paint formulation to match the code. Not surprising that the Glasurit paint match is so exact ....they supply paint to BMW in the first place.

Bob.
I would agree that painting a panel with a brush would not look dead on. However, I have used touch up brush applicators for small scratces with decent success. I've done this on a black sport bike and a silver bike frame. The key is to make sure that the paint is well and often shaken. Finish up later with a bit of rubbing compund and clear coat (you can get clear coat touch up kits as well).

Here's the paint codes:
orient blue metallic (which is what my bike color is): 317
Piemontrot: 912 (Red)
Graugrun: 442 (gray green)
Titansilber: 354 (silver)
You can see these codes here http://www.ascycles.com/Illustrated_catalog/K1200GT/catalog_frameset.html

These particular codes are the same as for the cars at the dealers. If you can't get the touch up kit at the bike dealer, then go to the car dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
RFWILSON said:
The color may be dead on, but when a metallic is applied with the brush supplied, the result can look anything but "dead on". Metallics cannot be successfully matched by brush application.

If you want a larger amount of a true paint match, paint is available dead-on matched to BMW's colors from the OEM paint manufacturer Glasurit. You need to get the Bike's Paint Code (not the "Finish Code" listed under the seat, but the actual PAINT CODE specified by the Finish Code). Once you have that, Glasurit has the exact paint formulation to match the code. Not surprising that the Glasurit paint match is so exact ....they supply paint to BMW in the first place.

Bob.
Bob,
Any opinion on the spray can touchup paint available from www.colorrite.com? I have a scrape about 1/4" wide by 4" long on a high spot on the side panel. I've been thinking about this spray can but don't know much about it. To use the Glasurit paint above, you'd have to have a paint rig, right? I'm not eager to go there.--Jerry
 

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Stephejl said:
Bob,
Any opinion on the spray can touchup paint available from www.colorrite.com? I have a scrape about 1/4" wide by 4" long on a high spot on the side panel. I've been thinking about this spray can but don't know much about it. To use the Glasurit paint above, you'd have to have a paint rig, right? I'm not eager to go there.--Jerry
I have never used this stuff myself. But regarding spray can metallics in general, there are a couple of points to remember.

First, as with nearly all spray can paints, the paint is thinned excessively in order to get it out the nozzle with the low pressure typical of aerosol cans. This results in a thin coat (once the paint has dried and the thinner has evaporated) as compared with a normal spray gun.

Related to that, the metallic "texture" tends to be hard to match, since the pressure is low, and the atomization is VERY poor compared to a spray gun; paint droplet size from a spray can is huge compared to that from a spray gun, or an airbrush, which means that you need a very "wet" coat in order to get the orange peel to flow out, and that in turn means the metallic particles tend to lay flat and appear darker.

Better than a brush, however! I use an airbrush minor touchups. You can purchase an airbrush kit that runs off a pressurized can that is pretty good for small areas.

But why not buy a can of the aerosol paint and try it on a scrap piece of metal to see if you can match the metallic texture and color? Maybe it will work just fine!

Bob.
 

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I have found out the hard way about this paint stuff.

If you want to match the paint, paint the complete panel.
I have talked to the folks that make, mix, and spray paint.

The stuff in the arousal cans can't work because they can't put the hardener's and other chemmical's in the can.

The color will fade in time.

If you want it exact, like a BMW, you need to paint it all.

That's what I think about that.

Bazra
aka: The Flash
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bazra,
Remeber you got the word from the fox on how to guard the chicken house. I'm sure they're right: if you want it perfect, then you have to paint the whole thing. However, my bikes will never be perfect again and that's not my goal. Those of you who do have that goal, I applaud you.

Bob,
Thanks for the detailed analysis on the difference between a spray can and a real paint job. Perhaps I should consider an air brush. I have two air compressors so that's not what's holding me back. Thanks, jerry
 

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bazra said:
I have found out the hard way about this paint stuff.

If you want to match the paint, paint the complete panel.
I have talked to the folks that make, mix, and spray paint.

The stuff in the arousal cans can't work because they can't put the hardener's and other chemmical's in the can.

The color will fade in time.

If you want it exact, like a BMW, you need to paint it all.
I agree that the best match is clearly to use professional auto paint (such as Glasurit), but it is entirely false that not being able to mix a catalyst with spray bomb paint, will result on a bad match.

First off, the paint that BMW uses is Glasurit "55 series" or "90 series" (55 is solvent-born and 90 is water-born), depending on the year of the bike. In both cases, the color coat is NOT catalyzed. Only the clearcoat is catalyzed.

Further, color fade has nothing at all to do with being catalyzed. Pigments are what fades, not the resin that binds the pigments, and it is the resin that is reacting with the catalyst. What fades is cheap pigments, that are sometimes found in cheap paints of any type.

Bob.
 
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