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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Howdy everyone!

I have a 2006 BMW K1200s with 50k+ miles. Transmission was replaced under warranty the first time around 15,000 miles in 2008. I was told it was probably replaced with an 08 transmission.

Fast forward to summer of 2019, transmission starts to kick out of second gear at high RPM's when giving it over 50% power. Took it to the dealer and they quoted me about $7k for parts, plus labor. The bike is not even worth that much. After reading the forums here, advrider.com, and the old kbike forum, I decided to tackle the jobs myself. Going to send the trans to Mark at R&D Motorsports in Clearwater, FL.

Got the transmission out last weekend. Took me maybe 4 hours getting it apart and taking many pictures.
Here's how she sits now.



Unfortunately when i removed the clutch cover, I found pieces of the timing chain rail have some how broken off the lower rail.



Now it looks like I'm going to have to take the valve cover off to replace the rail according to the BMW services DVD. This means I'll need to removed the radiator and get it filled again.

I have no idea how this broke and for how long its been broken. I had the big 12k services done in 2018 which included new valves.

I went to my local dealer to see what they can do. Tech said they would have to remove the engine and separate the head from the block to get the timing chain rails out. Said there are pins holding them both in. In the service dvd I see one pin holding the top. They said this would be about a 5hr job. Services manager was rude and said he should charge me for the info I'm getting the the tech, who is wrong about having to pull the engine out. So I walked out of the dealer pissed. Looks like I'm really doing this myself.

End Rant.
 

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Check your DVD but I believe the cam chain drive sprocket on the end of the crank shaft is removable un like a K13. This should let you pull the chain if needed. In my K13 I changed out both guide rails for the cam chain and the chain from the top with only removing the rocker cover. You will need to do some reading on how to vacuum fill your coolant. Need to get down to 25" of vacuum on the system while flowing fluid back in. Yup, just looked at the parts fiche at MAX and that sprocket comes off. They sell a kit with chain and two sprockets but you only really need this over 75K miles. Yes, tell that dealer you don't need him.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Check your DVD but I believe the cam chain drive sprocket on the end of the crank shaft is removable un like a K13. This should let you pull the chain if needed. In my K13 I changed out both guide rails for the cam chain and the chain from the top with only removing the rocker cover. You will need to do some reading on how to vacuum fill your coolant. Need to get down to 25" of vacuum on the system while flowing fluid back in. Yup, just looked at the parts fiche at MAX and that sprocket comes off. They sell a kit with chain and two sprockets but you only really need this over 75K miles. Yes, tell that dealer you don't need him.
Thanks for the reply Beech. My bike currently has 56k miles on it. I was thinking about just doin the chain and sprocket since i'm in there. But I may just wait til its over 75k miles.

I wonder if it would be a good idea to replace the valve cover gasket, bolts, and o-ring seals. Valve job was done at the stealership at 52k miles.
I was reading on this forum about K1200/1300 S/GT riders reusing the valve cover gasket and hardware.

On the way in the mail is a coil puller tool and lock Crank pin.
 

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a big yes on the oil oring seals between the head and the cam shaft bridge. The other seals like the interior gasket or rocker cover, if they are still soft just clean. The rocker cover gasket is very pesky. Clean all sealant out of inside and outside corners, then use tiny dabs of RTV high temp O2 sensor okay. This seals them and this is where leaks happen. Once spark plugs are out put some cloth in the holes before removing the nuts for the cam bridge. If you do them a turn or so at a time each all around you can get away with out using the factory hold down tool. You have to weigh the difficulty of getting to something vs the need to put new in. Anything that requires removing the radiator is always going to be new. With almost 60k miles, the water pump seal in the head around the shaft should be new. The Oring in the end of the intake cam that seals the shaft, new. Look at the parts diagram carefully and go for it. If you set all the valve clearence shims mid spec you should easily get 30,000 miles. Unless you spend lots of time over 8 or 9 K rpm. Normal hard use is just fine. Track time which I doubt makes for more valve work. After this is all done, you will really know your bike. There are vacuum kits for radiator work on Amazon. Here is one that should work. I have a factory one but this looks like it will do the job.
https://www.tooltopia.com/uview-550000.aspx
One use and you just saved $600. Go slow and enjoy the job. Pictures and careful lay out of parts you take off is the key. There is a gasket behind the water pump called the mud guard. If you carefully reposition it, should work. I use either 3M oring lube or Castrol red rubber grease on things like this to let them slip into position with no binding. Also works on all those rubber bushings that have faring parts with a tip that goes into them. I use this on any oring I want to stay in place but not bind like those little orings under the cam bridge. Most auto parts stores have Oring grease that is just fine.
 

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I forgot to mention when removing the air vent tube on the top of the rocker cover be very careful. it and the tube that curls back on the left of the bike become very brittle with age and heat. I pry each section that is in a rubber ring in the cover a little and work the whole tube out. (after removing the screws of course.) This is also a good place for some oring lube. Use sparingly.
 

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All this is great information, but it needs to be Organized and stored someplace where it won’t disappear like all the wisdom did in the I-BMW fiasco.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I forgot to mention when removing the air vent tube on the top of the rocker cover be very careful. it and the tube that curls back on the left of the bike become very brittle with age and heat. I pry each section that is in a rubber ring in the cover a little and work the whole tube out. (after removing the screws of course.) This is also a good place for some oring lube. Use sparingly.
Hey Beech,

Thanks for the tips on the air vent tubes.

I just plan on getting to where i can replace that cam chain slide. I had the water pump,valves, and spark plugs done 7k miles ago by the dealer. I'm thinking I can get away with cleaning off the valve cover gasket really good and just reuse it along with the o-rings around the valve cover bolts.

I bought this tool from ECS to help with the coolant refill.
https://www.ecstuning.com/b-schwaben-parts/coolant-refill-air-purge-tool/003466sch01/
Can't wait to try it out. After watching this video on youtube, it looks easy.

Mark at R & D Motorsports got my transmission today and will let me know what the damage is. All other parts and tools should be here soon.

I still need to have the brake fluid flushed and I may just take it to the dealer for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I got the valve cover off. Just need to get to the timing chain guide rail and the only thing holding me back is taking off the camshaft sprocket. How do i turn the crank to get to TDC?
 

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So you did not buy the DVD. Pictures there show you how to line up those little slash marks you see on the sprockets with the both of them. Be careful as you can get it 180 out. There is a problem between a few pictures. Also should use a crank locking pin in place of the crank pick up down in the front of the engine case with the wire. If it moves your in trouble.
 

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So you did not buy the DVD. Pictures there show you how to line up those little slash marks you see on the sprockets with the both of them. Be careful as you can get it 180 out. There is a problem between a few pictures. Also should use a crank locking pin in place of the crank pick up down in the front of the engine case with the wire. If it moves your in trouble.

LOL I did buy the DVD. It doesn't tell you how to turn the crank or what tool to use.


I'm going by "11 31 112 Replacing timing chain slide rails" from the DVD. It doesn't mention using the crank locking pin.
 

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Clockwise and with the sprocket nut on the crankshaft. Go carefully, attach chain to sprockets with a tie wrap so it won't jump. No pin needed if you watch it.
 

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Clockwise and with the sprocket nut on the crankshaft. Go carefully, attach chain to sprockets with a tie wrap so it won't jump. No pin needed if you watch it.
Beech, thank you! I appreciate your help and quick feedback. I managed to get the sprocket off and the guide rail out. What could of caused this to break?
 

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Well, first good job. Lucky it did not jump a tooth and destroy your engine. Did you have a jump guard installed? This helps when the cam chain does a little snake dance. Old age probably made things brittle. I changed mine out at 75k miles. I assume you don't rev your engine like the Harley guys. Can make the cam chain do wild stuff.

Below a couple of photos for others wondering, the dark shadow covering ball bearings on the right of the opening is a jump guard installed. You can look at this by removing that 2" plug over the crankshaft end that is in the cover plate.
 

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Well, first good job. Lucky it did not jump a tooth and destroy your engine. Did you have a jump guard installed? This helps when the cam chain does a little snake dance. Old age probably made things brittle. I changed mine out at 75k miles. I assume you don't rev your engine like the Harley guys. Can make the cam chain do wild stuff.

Below a couple of photos for others wondering, the dark shadow covering ball bearings on the right of the opening is a jump guard installed. You can look at this by removing that 2" plug over the crankshaft end that is in the cover plate.
Thank you Beech. I'm glad I caught this before really damaging the engine. Yes, I had the jump guard installed.

Question: How can you tell if the clutch basket is bad? The springs in the basket rattle when i shake it. I assume this is what causes the rattle noise when in neutral. I wonder if I should replace it while it's all out.

Thanks!
 

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The basket will have wear in the inside teeth from the plates. Beyond what you can file smooth and be realistic. Being a K12 bike, there is an expensive route, buy K13 parts including the drive unit that matches the K13 basket. You can easily get into this for 2400$. Or, just clean everything up, sand and file the rough teeth in the basket and put in a barnett kit. The K13 has a smaller inner plate and in that gap caused by the smaller plate (larger diameter) are two parts a spacer and a bellville washer that the spacer keeps from digging into the aluminum drive surface of the inner basket. At this point in life, it might be worth a try risking a couple of hundred vs big bucks to go K13 OeM parts. If the basket inner thrust face is worn any (not flat) it probably is trash. If you try to cut it flat in a lathe then the plate stack thickness will not be correct. You might get away with .005" wear and then cut it flat at that depth but...
The K13 clutch has oil holes drilled in the inner basket to lube the plates, a more free flowing throw out push rod etc. If you can find a used one on eBay buy it.
I found an almost new S bike clutch for the shelf for my S1000R. It is worth 2 grand and I paid 100 bucks.
 

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A barnett clutch is only about 150$. Little risk. buying the oem laminar pack and a new basket will set you back 2300$. With time on our hands why not try the Barnett. Don't forget do not use the spacer and spring that goes with the small first plate towards the pressure face with a Barnett pack. Be sure to save it though in case you go back to stock parts. It is really pesky to scissor the the gear drive together to get it back in. The factory tool was useless. I ended up with a piece of bent welding rod in the hole using needle nose vice grips to tension the gears and insert the tool. you will know when you are in far enough when the gear faces are flush. That means the oil drive sprocket in the back of the clutch has meshed properly. Some have tightened things up without the pins or dogs engaged and it is not good. The tension on the oil pump drive chain is a little more that what is needed to keep the left side from touching anything when you press on it. I have the tool but it ends up like that. It took me several attempts until I figured that just do it by hand.
Take some emery paper and smooth up the edges on the tangs where the plates have worn. Don't remove much metal, just take out burrs and sharp edges.
 
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