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Strafist
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I just got thru reading Keith Code’s, Twist of the Wrist II.



The best tip for the average rider that I found was what’s called The Big Picture. Pick a point on the wall and stare it. Without moving your head, or eyes, stare at another point to the left, then the right. Pick points farther out and practice.



This tip really helps your peripheral vision and is supposed to relieve fatigue from moving your head and eye’s.



I found that when entering curves I was completing the curve with no problem, but didn’t seem to have any push left if an emergency situation came up. I posted this question on this board and was given the following tip:



Weigh the OUTER peg. It forms a triangle with the body that needs to stay purdy much in the center of the bike (don’t hang off). This triangle transfers the weight to the counter steering arm. It seems I was leaning off the bike too far and leaving no weight on the counter steering arm.. I developed this bad habit with the LT as I don’t like dragging parts. Leaning off of the LT gave me more ground clearance. Not only is dragging counter productive, but it slows you down and it freaked me out. You wouldn’t believe how hard it is to change a 6 year old, 108,000 mile habit. Not to mention developing new muscles, mainly in the thigh. This tip intrigued me enough to buy the book.



Throttle control was very important in this book, the constant roll on thru the corner was emphasized many times as was steering only once. Pick your spot to apex, quickly steer into it and be done. Posture was covered and overcoming your Survival Responses was hammered throughout the book.



A bunch of this book applied to the race track, but there was plenty in there for all to improve there riding skills. You never know when nailing a corner harder than you need to might save your life. Maximum braking, suspension and weight transfer was also covered.



Though this book is 15 years old it's still relevant and I heartily recommend this book for anybody wanting to improve their riding skills, or for those that are just curious how racers do it.
 

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grifscoots said:
I just got thru reading Keith Code’s, Twist of the Wrist II.
+1 for the book. I read it years ago when I was just starting to ride. You've made me want to go reread it. Oh cool there's an ebook torrent for it, I'll take it with me on my cross country ride! [It's not stealing if you already own the book, right? :)]
 

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bonafidebob said:
Oh cool there's an ebook torrent for it, I'll take it with me on my cross country ride! [It's not stealing if you already own the book, right? :)]
Bob,

I download torrent files all the time that run the gamut from a particular Rush or Eric Clapton concert to all five seasons of The Wire on HBO. I wouldn't feel badly about that at all. Plus, as you say you own the book. Dumb question - will the e-book be able to impart as much information as the written edition? I'm assuming Code has included drawings and diagrams, no?

Speaking of the book, another great post Grif. I'm just about finished with David Hough's second effort, More Proficient Motorcycling and I wanted to get going on another. Believe I'll place an order at Amazon for Twist of The Wrist I and II.

I'm on my third month of riding versus your years of experience. Need all the help I can get to establish good habits.

David
 

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Strafist
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Discussion Starter #4
Them dayem habits are hard to break. Not to mention trying to put together all I learned in the book. I just wish I really rode in my younger days. Started with a Honda Trail 70 when I was 13, put around 28,000 miles on it (lived in the country), Honda SL175 at 15, SL 350 at 17, Triumph TR6C at 20 and then I really fucked up. Harley from 22 to 44. That's what I meant by really riding. I preferred the FXR style as they had more ground clearance and rode everywhere, all over the states, but didn't know what riding was really like till I got a BMW in 2000. You done good!

Excuse me while I go and polish some chrome. NOT!
 

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dpancerz said:
Dumb question - will the e-book be able to impart as much information as the written edition? I'm assuming Code has included drawings and diagrams, no?
First a plug: I've got the Sony PRS-505 ebook reader, which can handle greyscale diagrams and pictures just fine. It's actually a pretty fantastic device for this sort of thing. It's a perfect fit for the glove box on the GT, it'll hold dozens of books, and the batteries are good for a couple of weeks. If I'm riding alone I'll read at meal breaks and to fall asleep at night. Mine is full of SF books, many of which I've read before. There's lots of good (legal) stuff out there, e.g. feedbooks.com, and it's pretty easy to set it up to convert stuff from the internet to an ebook, so you can make a daily customized newspaper without much effort.

That said, the torrent of TotW2 I found is VERY poor quality and will look like crap on my ebook reader. It's a PDF of scanned in pages from the book itself, with poor registration, angled text, and bad contrast. It's not worth the time to download IMHO, though it does include the diagrams.
 

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Oh Ya, Go faster have more FUN.

Great stuff in that book, then when you have it all down tight and you are cutting the apex at the right spot and coming on with more throttle 3/4 way in the turn, the right way, CHANGE IT!!

Practice changing your line in the middle of the turn, or braking, just like there was something in the road. So when there is something laying in the road you will be able to correct and get around it.

Now if I can just figure how to practice my getting off the bike and sliding with-out leaving marks on the bike.
 

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corners

Damn you guys ride different over there. I have enough trouble not dropping my beer let alone reading a damn book whilst scraping.
 

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grifscoots said:
I just got thru reading Keith Code’s, Twist of the Wrist II.



The best tip for the average rider that I found was what’s called The Big Picture. Pick a point on the wall and stare it. Without moving your head, or eyes, stare at another point to the left, then the right. Pick points farther out and practice.

...

A bunch of this book applied to the race track, but there was plenty in there for all to improve there riding skills. You never know when nailing a corner harder than you need to might save your life. Maximum braking, suspension and weight transfer was also covered.



Though this book is 15 years old it's still relevant and I heartily recommend this book for anybody wanting to improve their riding skills, or for those that are just curious how racers do it.
Thanks Grif. Good advice. The peripheral vision exercise is a good one. When street riding, sometimes it is hard to look into the turn, when you need to focus on potential road surface hazards and vehicles that might invade your space at the same time.

I just finished reading the original "Twist of the Wrist" (not II). I learned a lot about motorcycle racing techniques which were very interesting, but I didn't find much that I could apply to the street riding situations that I encounter. Have you read the original Twist of the Wrist? If so, what is the difference between it and the version you just read?

You might enjoy "Sport Riding Techniques: How To Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety, and Confidence on the Street and Track" by Nick Ienatsch. This book came highly recommended by others on this forum, and I found it to be very good, too.
 

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Strafist
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Discussion Starter #9
Papilio said:
Damn you guys ride different over there. I have enough trouble not dropping my beer let alone reading a damn book whilst scraping.
I can't seem to keep my joint lit and my lines keep blowing off the tank. Sigh. Substance abuse is just so hard to practice on a bike.
 

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Strafist
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Discussion Starter #10
XMagnaRider said:
I Have you read the original Twist of the Wrist? If so, what is the difference between it and the version you just read?
No, I haven't. In keeping with my total asshole and sarcastic personality- The difference twixt the books is the II:teeth


XMagnaRider said:
You might enjoy "Sport Riding Techniques: How To Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety, and Confidence on the Street and Track" by Nick Ienatsch. This book came highly recommended by others on this forum, and I found it to be very good, too.
I keep hearing that, but have to read some trash first, you know, the mystery, killing thangs. To much informational and educational stuff just clouds an already cluttered brainpan.
 

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grifscoots said:
No, I haven't. In keeping with my total asshole and sarcastic personality- The difference twixt the books is the II:teeth


I keep hearing that, but have to read some trash first, you know, the mystery, killing thangs. To much informational and educational stuff just clouds an already cluttered brainpan.
...and when you remove the magnetic plug from the brainpan, what do you find?
 

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XMagnaRider said:
I just finished reading the original "Twist of the Wrist" (not II). I learned a lot about motorcycle racing techniques which were very interesting, but I didn't find much that I could apply to the street riding situations that I encounter. Have you read the original Twist of the Wrist? If so, what is the difference between it and the version you just read?
Look here for a comparison: http://www.motorcycle.com/products/a-twist-of-the-wrist-3967.html
 

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How'bout taking their classes? You have a lot of possibilities residing in the US - no need for overseas travelling or even across the continent. :) On the contrary, Keith Code's school is traveling around the country.
 

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Strafist
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Discussion Starter #15
easyman05 said:
How'bout taking their classes? You have a lot of possibilities residing in the US - no need for overseas travelling or even across the continent. :) On the contrary, Keith Code's school is traveling around the country.
I'm thinking Keith's class might be a little over my head after reading the book. I should probably start on his training wheel bike.
 

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grifscoots said:
I'm thinking Keith's class might be a little over my head after reading the book. I should probably start on his training wheel bike.
Every now and again Keith does (or used to do) a free seminar as part of Doc Wong's rides. I went to one of these (along with a hundred other people) and found it interesting, though there wasn't much opportunity for one on one feedback (I kept my arms too stiff). Anyway, Keith was very friendly and not at all pretentious about track vs street. I think there'd be a lot to learn from one of his courses even for a street rider. ...good way to break bad habits if nothing else.
 

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Strafist
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Discussion Starter #17
bonafidebob said:
Every now and again Keith does (or used to do) a free seminar as part of Doc Wong's rides. I went to one of these (along with a hundred other people) and found it interesting, though there wasn't much opportunity for one on one feedback (I kept my arms too stiff). Anyway, Keith was very friendly and not at all pretentious about track vs street. I think there'd be a lot to learn from one of his courses even for a street rider. ...good way to break bad habits if nothing else.
I met Keith and his boys (and one gal) at a hotel in Leeds, Alabama. I stayed there as I was going to the Barber Museum the next day and they were giving a class at the track.

They were freaking out that I rode there from Texas, I was freaking out listening to their stories. Very nice bunch of folks.
 
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