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We all know the story on the need for the jump guard and tensioner. But has anyone put a good amount of miles on the upgraded parts? How long do they last?

My bike was in the shop today for a 60,000 mile service today and I got this note from the shop

when the tech closed up your bike and started it, it seemed to be much louder than before. Part of it was not having the body panels on, but we looked into the noise further and found the cam chain tensioner at it’s most extended point, and the cam chain guide rails visually worn. The cam chain is also worn as are the cam sprockets. To replace all these parts is 450

My bike had the upgraded tensioner and jump guard installed at 38,000 miles. So the tensioner and guide rails wore out in 22,000 miles? Even if it did, those things are cheap. But the chain and sprockets aren't cheap. Are those things known to wear?
 

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well for me anyway and this is soley my opinion but i believe what happend to your bike is the cause of not changing the sprocket and chain and the loose chain is what caused the wear again my opinion...my mechanic at the dealer in which i have been going to for a decade suggested very strongly that i change the chain and sprocket's at the 36-k service, and i did!! he showed me the slack when the bike was being serviced and i agreed ,some slack is ok but this is the weakest point of the bike so what the hell
and 450 is alot cheaper than a new motor when it does decide to jump
my old sprocket's and chain hang in my garage now and my bike feel's tighter than a bulls ass in fly season at 44-k now and at this point i still would'nt trade her in for anything else and have gained alot more confidence in the bike since doing so ,hope this helps..
 

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Since the tensioner is hydraulically operated by oil pressure created by a running engine I'd like to know how the dealer knows that it is operating at its most extended point?
 

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smiller said:
Since the tensioner is hydraulically operated by oil pressure created by a running engine I'd like to know how the dealer knows that it is operating at its most extended point?
That's what I was thinking...and change out the works at 36K?? WTF? And repeat every 36? I may be a mile off here, but my belief is that if the guard and new tensioner is installed early in the bikes life, your gold. If you wait for the slop to start, you are chasing the problem.

Real curious about how the stealer determined full extension...?

kbikeinbc
07Kgt
 

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kbikeinbc said:
That's what I was thinking...and change out the works at 36K?? WTF? And repeat every 36? I may be a mile off here, but my belief is that if the guard and new tensioner is installed early in the bikes life, your gold. If you wait for the slop to start, you are chasing the problem.

Real curious about how the stealer determined full extension...?

kbikeinbc
07Kgt
from what i understand he know's it because of the failures that have happend (chain jump) then examining the chain and sprocket ,also expeiriance,its also his recommendaition ,as a very knowledgable tech who also ride's a k bike and as i said has been working on my bike's for over a decade plus 450 bucks is alot cheaper than a new motor
he does admit's that bmw wont support thiis claim on paper and probably thinks (bmw) overall that the gaurds are working which they probably are but said if you want total piece of mind and plan on keeping the bike you mite want to consider it ,especially the way i ride (very spirited we'll say)
problem now is i have been eyeing the f800gt so who know's how long i'll be keeping her ..lol
 

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Get the worn parts replaced if they need it and install the APE tensioner. No more worries about BMW tensioners not doing their job, (even the "upgraded" model has incidents of jumping chains).
 

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moymurfs said:
Get the worn parts replaced if they need it and install the APE tensioner. No more worries about BMW tensioners not doing their job.
This.

36K is way too low for this, unless the old tensioner is weak and the chain has been slapping around. If you think the chain is worn/stretched, then replace it and the sprockets. Otherwise, just leave it alone. But add the APE tensioner and jump guard either way.

My '07 went 138K miles on the factory cam chain, sprockets, and tensioner. If I was still riding it, I might preemptively replace the chain/sprockets due to high mileage only.

But it would definitely have the APE tensioner and jump guard installed.
 

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Which brings me back.....the AP set up is not the way I would go. I get that it holds steady tension. But I wonder, how much is enough? Too much? From what I have read its a "set by feel type of adjustment" Maybe I am missing something but if I get the kind of mileage Meese got before a sprocket change out, I will stick to stock rather than roll the dice on a "set by feel" set up...

Kbikeinbc

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Sure, the "set by feel" technique is a bit vague. But that's the way a lot of bikes have been doing it for years, including most race bikes. The advantage is that once set, it won't back off. The disadvantage is that once set, it won't extend any further as the chain naturally stretches somewhat over normal use. If you know that, you can simply readjust it at certain intervals, say every 18K miles when you do a valve check.

The simplest method is to screw the APE tensioner in until you just start to feel some resistance. Then start the engine, and back the tensioner out slightly until you just hear a little noise. Then screw it in (counting the number of turns) until its starts to get snug. Back it out maybe halfway to the "noisy" position, then tighten it down.

My 1979 Yamaha XS1100 had a spring-loaded chain tensioner. As part of the periodic maintenance, you would remove the tensioner, push the plunger all the way in against the spring, then hold it in place with a lock bolt. The reinstall it and release the lock bolt, causing the spring to extend the plunger to the correct tension. Then tighten the lock bolt and nut to hold things in place. Simple, reliable, effective.

The advantage of the factory tensioner is that it will self adjust, using oil pressure. The disadvantage is that when oil pressure is low (such as right at startup) it can be too loose, allowing for unintended chain slap, and possible damage. The jump guard helps to minimize this damage, but it's a band-aid at best. Low oil pressure at idle also allows for the slop to slightly affect the valve timing, possibly leading to a slightly rough idle.

What BMW should do is develop an oil-pressureized tensioner that has a built-in ratcheting mechanism, similar to what some other manufacturers use. Oil pressure tensions the chain as required, and the ratchet means that it won't back off from there.

Most likely, BMW will add something similar to the next motor redesign, and keep on telling the rest of us that what we have works just fine, but we really should take the new bike out for a test ride . . . :bmw:
 

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I am also in the group questioning the advisability of a manual tensioner. I haven't heard of a single failure in a bile equipped with both the new tensioner and a jump guard so I don't see the wisdom of applying some unknown amount of manual tension that may or may not be optimal... seems like there's a reasonable chance of introducing a problem rather than solving one. Since the updates seem to have fixed the original problem I just don't see the benefit of messing with it.

And the new tensioner has an oil resovoir to prevent the tensioner from becoming loose on startup and this seems to be working perfectly in my bike, since the install of the upgraded tensioner I can't hear even a hint of chain rattle at startup even if I listen for it. Ratcheting tensioners are another way of achieving this but they have issues of their own.
 

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Meese said:
This.

36K is way too low for this, unless the old tensioner is weak and the chain has been slapping around. If you think the chain is worn/stretched, then replace it and the sprockets. Otherwise, just leave it alone. But add the APE tensioner and jump guard either way.

My '07 went 138K miles on the factory cam chain, sprockets, and tensioner. If I was still riding it, I might preemptively replace the chain/sprockets due to high mileage only.

But it would definitely have the APE tensioner and jump guard installed.

Agreed. And whatever you do, don't do chain without sprockets or vice/versa. You'd be better off doing nothing. Chains stretch, that's why there is a tensioner. Chains rarely break. I'm in the camp of leave it alone unless it is visibly worn for some reason. I prefer the self adjusting hydraulic tensioner but either way - you decide. Hydraulic=self adjusting, manual= you adjust.
 
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