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Hello. I'm looking at a 1985 K100rs that appears to be in great shape and great working order. Owner says it has 70,000 miles. Is this high? What is considered high miles on a classic K?

Thanks.
 

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I saw a K100 at the Durango rally that had over 350K on the clock. It looked it too!! But the rider came in from Fairbanks on it and had enough faith in it to put it through another several thousand mile round trip.
 

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Generally, a bike ridden regularly and maintained will be less trouble than one that's sat for a long time. Rubber bits dry out a crack, hydraulics go bad, gas gums up, etc. Miles are not as relevant as maintenance. 70K ain't much miles. 200K would be alot.
 

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+1; Bikes that are ridden ---are taken care of.
 

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I bought my first k100 with 100,000 miles and put about 20,000 tough miles on it only changing the oil and filters. Did nothing else to it.

Bought my second one with 55,000. Had to do basic things that include older K maintenance. These are the main things I did to keep it up and running with approximate prices.

- Replaced Clutch Cable $25
- Replaced brushes in starter $25
- Lube both rear splines $10 on honda moly
- Replaced Throttle Cable $25
- Changed Gear box oil $8
- Replaced burned out radiator fan with new motor $69.95
- Replaced radiator fluid $15
- Hall sensor failed, replace with used one with 55k miles $170 - rebuilt old one for $40
- Replaced spark plugs with Bosch $14
- Replace fuel filter $20
- Water pump seals shot - used $120 unit - rebuild $50 or so + luck.

So like people say, depends on what was already done. I'd say that most of these things are the likely suspects with an aging bike. Then again I got the bike so cheap i don't really mind a hundred here or there to make it pristine and reliable.
 

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better used than neglected

It's not the miles. It's the distribution of the miles, and it's what you want the bike for.

I recently bought a 1990 K75C with about 40k on the clock. Half what you are looking at. Those forty thou were all achieved in the first ten years of life. The last ten years, she sat. Consequently, I had to replace every rubber tube, clean the injectors, replace the fuel pump, replace tires, drain and fill every fluid, replace battery, and debug some electrical connections. That's what a syncopated mile distribution does to a machine. On the other hand, I specifically bought the thing because I was looking for a project. All those items above are no big task for a guy who likes a project bike. But they do reduce the price you pay.

On the other hand, what if I had wanted a bike just to jump on and ride? Or what if I was one of these wrenchophobes who thought he had to tote every little problem to the BMW dealer, bend over, and get reamed? In either case, Then I would have been looking for a ride which had 40k added in the first ten years and another 40k added in the last ten.

Bottom line: Look beyond the mileage. The bike you're looking at is 25 years old. 3,000 miles a year is pretty minimum mileage. Has it been run consistently all that while? If not, is the price real low, and are you willing to wrench?
 

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Watch the rubber/lubricants...

My bike had 47k on the clock (miles) and I considered myself lucky that it was so low.

I replaced most of the rubber on her (still have the intake boots to do eventually) just for piece of mind.

The only ones that had actually failed were the vacuum tap caps.

She'd sat for a little while but it was only enough to lock up the fuel pump (unlocked it by turning it with a screwdriver and running it on the bench forwards and backwards) and looked a little grungy.

I figure it was like getting a zero miles bike at this point.
 
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